Our goal is to collect one piece of litter every day for one year.

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Environment News Pollution stopping pollution tips

Our goal is to collect one piece of litter every day for one year.

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We are collecting one piece of litter every day for 365 days around our local area of Cambridge, New Zealand.

This is our small way of doing what we believe is right in helping clean up litter and helping the environment. Inspired by @onepieceoflitteraday

We all must play our part. If each person collected one piece of rubbish every day for a year across the world, we would be having a different conversation about climate change and pollution.

Why should we all be collecting litter?

I’m sure you would agree, there is no need for littering in today’s world with the resources that local councils and governments provide – is it as simple as laziness?

Possibly. We believe it has become part of today’s culture, around the world where people of all ages think they have the right to do as they please with no repercussions for their behaviour or the environment.

In some cases we have seen first-hand, people walking over litter and even kicking it out of the way without registering that it is rubbish. How did we become like this?

In New Zealand, there are many bins for all our rubbish, however, for some inexplicable reason, people do not dispose of their litter in a bin or take it home. This is not a new message, why do people ignore it?

Stop Litter in New Zealand

Litter, although it seems harmless enough, is just a piece of paper or plastic lying around. It can’t do too much harm, right?

Firstly, litter looks ugly and then over time it breaks down to smaller micro pieces, which have been entering waterways and affecting local wildlife.

Over the last three decades, we have seen a major increase in sea pollution from land-based rubbish flowing into our seas and rivers – this is not a new problem but needs action now to stop it.

It’s time for everyone to say enough is enough. It’s time to do the right thing.

Visit Keep New Zealand Beautiful to find more information, people doing great things, how you can help to keep New Zealand, our country green.

We also will have other resources available on our resources page.

PLASTIC POLLUTION – 5 Ways you can help tackle it.

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climate change Environment News stopping pollution tips

PLASTIC POLLUTION – 5 Ways you can help tackle it.

A great article from Earthday Blog on plastic pollution. We are going to implement as many of these into our 2020 goals.

The use of plastic in our world is staggering — we as humans have created some 8.3 billion metric tons of plastic, the equivalent 800,000 Eiffel Towers. 

Plastic pollution is a problem because of its long-lasting effects — this petroleum-based, man-made material never fully degrades. According to estimates by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, one plastic bottle takes at least 450 years to break down. Recent research suggests that worldwide, only 9 percent of plastics ever made have been recycled.  

With numbers like this, it can be discouraging to try to tackle the problem. We find plastics littered from rivers to streets, ingested by land animals and aquatic species alike. But small lifestyle changes, education and outreach efforts can add up to make a big difference. Here are five individual actions you can take today to cut plastic pollution.

1. Plastic pollution – Reduce, reuse, recycle, refuse

Tossing your plastic package into the recycling bin used to feel like a win, but after China and other Asian countries stopped taking our plastic waste in 2018, these packages have been piling up overseas. The bottom line: Recycling is not as straightforward as many of us once thought

Recycling is tough, but to ensure your recyclable waste gets where it needs to go, check out our 7 common recycling mistakes and tips. Of course, refusing plastics in the first place or opting for alternative products is a surefire way to reduce your impacts.

2. Become a citizen scientist for Earth Day with Earth Challenge 2020 

If you’re itching to become even more active in the fight against plastic pollution, look no further than Earth Challenge 2020, the largest ever citizen science initiative. Earth Challenge 2020 is a mobile app that empowers everyone to be a citizen scientist. Citizen scientists who use the app can enter data and answer a handful of research questions, one of which explores the extent of plastic pollution in their area. 

3. Participate in The Great Global Cleanup

Another exciting opportunity to spearhead the end of plastic pollution is Earth Day Network’s campaign The Great Global Cleanup. This event aims to be “The Largest Environmental Volunteer Event in History” as a celebration of citizen science and the strength of community. There are many existing cleanup events events already in the works. If there is no cleanup already organized in your area, you can register a cleanup of your own. 

4. Support policy change 

While there are many lifestyle shifts and actions that each of us can take as individuals, ending plastic pollution requires a two-pronged approach. This includes innovations in technology and policy changes. The list of cities, states, businesses and entire countries that are placing bans on plastics continues to grow, providing a reason for hope. 

California has become a leader in the United States, becoming the first state to ban single-use plastic bags. Canada also recently pledged to ban single use plasticscompletely by 2021. You can support these global efforts by signing petitions, communicating with your local representatives and supporting coalitions dedicated to stopping plastic pollution.  

5. Take the pledge to End Plastic Pollution

There’s no need to sit idly by while plastic piles up. Knowledge is power, so get educated and spread the word. Take advantage of Earth Day Network’s many resources, such as the Pledge to End Plastic Pollution and plastic calculator. If you enjoy a good read, check out the Plastic Pollution Primer and toolkit

More than 8.3 billion metric tons of plastic are not just going to disappear — steer progress the way you want to see it. Between making your weekly grocery lists, volunteering in your community and spreading the word, bringing down plastic pollution is something we can all tackle together. 

Read our other articles on pollution and what you can do about it.

https://www.climateimpact.co.nz/plastics-will-outweigh-fish-in-the-ocean-how-does-it-affect-you-and-what-should-you-do/
https://www.climateimpact.co.nz/wave-goodbye-to-more-single-use-plastics/

Making sustainable changes this holiday season

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stopping pollution tips

Making sustainable changes this holiday season

Making sustainable changes doesn’t mean you have to give up on your favourite traditions! It’s actually a lot easier than you think, and in most cases a lot cheaper. We’ll be sharing our top three tips for creating an eco-friendly Christmas, that are fun, easy and thoughtful.

sustainable changes Tip #1: Buy local NZ made gifts

Buying New Zealand made gifts minimises your carbon footprint due to no air-travel or long-distance transportation, and it boosts our economy! We love: https://www.greenelephant.co.nz/ an NZ marketplace where you’ll find fantastic eco gifts for everyone!

sustainable changes Tip #2 Opt for eco wrapping

Did you know most traditional forms of wrapping paper are not recyclable? Glitter, plastic coating and certain dyes prohibit wrapping paper from being recycled. Opting for more eco-friendly options like brown recyclable paper, jars, tins or fabric wraps made from old clothes, tea towels or scarves.

These sustainable changes options are not only better for the environment, but make uniquely beautiful christmas presents. Decorate with twigs of rosemary or pohutukawa wrapping to add a touch of festive joy!

sustainable changes Tip #3 Make your own cards

We get it, Christmas cards are great to give and receive but aside from keeping the very touching ones, majority of them are thrown out just a short time after being received. This Christmas, why not make cards out of the ones you received last year? Or use a child’s artwork, or your own artistic skills to create a unique and thoughtful Christmas card